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  1. NAeem at |

    LOL the real war of terror is on what a joke piece, the reality is all muslim nations apart from gaza or iran have no legitimacy these regime steal rob and torture for their own ends. The end of these regimes is near but before they fall we have a new force involved the AQ a unit that is following instructions from the gulf states and the zionist west to wreak havoc in the ME to further delegitimize the opposition to these regime and further enhance the credibility of these regimes. China, russia, india are occupying muslims lands if its terrorism to attack them then their rule is based on STATE TERRORISM becaue no one wants them to there in the first place. Oppression is oppression regardless of who inflicts it from the US, israel to the sauds these regimes are oppressors but so are the iraqi and syrian regime and so are AQ their are no heroes.

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  2. Zainab at |

    This is an interesting piece but I don’t think it’s wholly realistic. It’s much too early to confirm the emergence of the “security arc.” The very fact that there are so many queries on “another seismic shift” is enough evidence that it’s still in its infancy, a garbled picture and a subjective issue putting speculations of different kinds in different minds. History tells us more often than not that episodes like thse seemingly in the making, eventually never to materialize. So, I wouldn’t get too fixated on it .. not at this point.

    Secondly, I don’t think it would be correct to categorize UAE with the rest of the GCC, certainly not concerning the Syrian war. UAE has long seen the radical Salafists as a threat to its liberal social infrastructure which is also the foundation of its bubbling economy.

    Thirdly, I agree with the policymakers’ plan of first getting rid of Assad, then weakening Iran, both via the Salafists, and finally getting rid of the Salafists. Of course that didn’t happen. I also agree that “Assad didn’t fall” and “Hezbollah dug in;” but Iran, with Rouhani at the helm, has been on the verge of wavering if it wasn’t for the chief of the Revolutionary Guards, Mohammed Jaffari. Yet, we can clearly sense the fraying of the Resistance with Syria and Hezbollah strongly committed to their goal and Iran displaying a milder resolve in clasping the Resistance. Apparently, the first priority of Rouhani’s government is the Iranian economy and to have a portion of the sanctions lifted at the earliest. Neither he nor the supreme leader seem willing to jeopardize it. Mr. Rouhani certainly doesn’t consider this to be the right time for abounding stories of Iran’s warm ties with Hezbollah and Syria reaching the WH. Moreover, the Rouhani/Rafsanjani bloc has since long had different plans for Iran and thus hasn’t been overly enthusiastic about the idea of a consolidated Resistance. It’s only the unit consisting of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards that hasn’t wavered, and indeed that’s a very vital unit.

    Frankly, something that’s being downplayed by everyone is Iran’s clear shift in foreign policy and the unavoidable consequences it would have particularly on the Levant …. maybe not immediately but on the long term.

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