8 Responses

  1. Rahul at |

    What is happening in the world is because of the frustration of the majority community of that country. It should be a great lesson to every politician, especially those who are in power. Tolerance has its own limit.

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  2. scallywag at |

    In the end the Western states, like the grand mafia daddy gave their blessing and as Mr Gaddafi was being led away he must have sensed in this brutal game of thuggery that he was just a keen player of that there would be little respite for himself. Who there will also be very little respite for if history is to be a judge are the rebels who risked their life to bring a closure to this leadership, only to begin the onset of what already appears to be an equally violent and repugnant leadership to follow. The US and its allies on the other hand have once again played the script to perfection, and one senses it will only be a matter of time, no scratch that minutes before they begin claiming what they (rightfully) believe is theirs. Now the real fun has begun…

    http://scallywagandvagabond.com/2011/10/the-moment-of-muammar-gaddafis-capture-and-what-are-we-to-make-of-it/

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  3. Enrique Ferro at |

    The killing of the Libyan leader can be reconstructed so. He was captured by the British SAS two days earlier. When Clinton said she would be happy if he was killed, he was already her prisoner. After her speech she ordered him dead, and he was delivered to NATO mercenaries. Among his killers there were Colombian paramilitaries. The killing date: Oct. 19. And Clinton’s identification with J. Caesar and laugh of a corpse is disgusting and despicable.

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    Thomas Reply:

    This makes more sense than anything I believe Enrique Ferro Has the correct scoop

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  4. Matt Cusumano at |

    The only mistake I think Qadaff i can be blamed for was trying to appease the west. He felt an obligation to end the crippling sanctions against him, and realized that if he didn’t play ball, the west could concoct any number of false flag events, with him being portrayed as the perpetrator. He should have kept his military stronger, he never should have released the political prisoners, never should have relinquished any power to his political enemies (which he did at the request of Saif Al Islam, who was innocent, but naive). He was in a very difficult position, and he was up against the entire west, so I give him credit for putting up as good of a fight as he did. Fact remains that he had escaped Sirte, and was on his way to freedom, except for the French Fighter bomber that struck his convoy 3 miles out of town with 500 lb bombs. Absent this convoy, Gadaffi would be free and alive right now. He’s my personal hero, and he’ll be remembered as one of the true heros of the entire world.

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  5. Tom at |

    He is also mine

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  6. Enrique Ferro at |

    I agree with you, appeasement is always wrong, it emboldens the aggressor, whom one cannot trust at all. We have the historic events of Munich, and then the Ribbentrop-Molotov Non-Aggression Pact (not exactly appeasement, but almost).
    But did Gaddafi have the choice? Libya’s life standards had been falling under the embargo plight, so that Libya needed to breath. The issue with this appeasement is that it had strings attached, i.e., the introduction of foreign “free enterprise”.
    Gaddafi sought to keep his independence by promoting the African Union and a common African currency. He was playing a dangerous brinkmanship, because the investments he intended for civil development implied the refusal to buy expensive and useless weapons to the West (particularly the Rafales to France). He must have thought that his new friendship with the West protected him, while he was promoting liberating policies for Africa. It couldn’t go unnoticed. YOU CANNOT TRUST IMPERIALISM. It is marauding and seeking the first occasion to destroy you, especially if you have something it can take from you. The consequence of the appeasement, to renounce to his non-conventional defense programmes, led to his perdition.
    After this each sovereign, independent state will think it twice. We enter an age of proliferation. Gaddafi’s fate will be present in every mind.

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  7. michael at |

    Gaddafi will live forever in my heart, a true man of the people. he died in battle defending them.

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